Tag Archives: Tips On Buying A Used Car

Tips On Buying A Used Car

3 Tips On Buying A Used Car

Courtesy of: Auto Trader

Learn three essential tips to help safeguard you and your money for searching for your dream car.

Tips On Buying A Used Car

Going to a dealership to buy a car, be a franchise dealer, an independent or a car supermarket means you are protected by the 1979 Sale of Goods Act this states that any item you buy from a trader that someone selling goods as a business in the shop or online must be fit for purpose as described and of satisfactory quality. Although this isn’t legally defined, it is related to the age price and condition of the car at the time of sale. So, you need to bear these factors in mind if it isn’t deemed to be of satisfactory quality and the car is faulty then you must get in contact with the dealership as soon as possible and give them the opportunity to put it right. If buying from a private individual, the car that was offered must still fit the description in the advert plus what the seller has told you. If it doesn’t, then you may have a claim onto the misrepresentation act.

 

Tips On Buying A Used Car

Never buy a car sight unseen and always check the details on the documents match the physical car you’re buying including the fact you’re viewing the car from the seller’s registered address. Every car comes with what’s known as the v5c complete with watermark. This is basically a car’s birth certificate, so if the car doesn’t come with one of these or it looks like it’s been tampered with, walk away. V5cn in hand, there are two acronyms you then need to check matchup, these are the VR or the vehicle registration mark better known as the registration plate and the VIN – vehicle identification number sometimes called the chassis number. The VIN is a unique 17 character number issues to every vehicle by the manufacturer and can be found stamped into various parts of the body chassis including a plate under the bonnet fix to the post between the front and rear doors and on a visible place near the dashboard. These are time-consuming details to check if correct and haven’t been tampered with but if you’re meeting a genuine owner with a genuine car, they let you get on with it. Make sure you check the vehicles handbook, the log book has a full service history and there are two sets of keys. If the car is tax and more than three years old, it should also carry a valid MOT certificate. Another service we’d always recommend you use is the vehicle history check. There are plenty of providers who offer this service but for one of the, it contact the DVLA, the Police National Computer database and the Association and British Insurers to see if the car is out any outstanding finance, always previously been stolen all written off by an insurance company. Outstanding finance doesn’t have to be a deal breaker. If you still keen, you can speak to the finance company to find out what the settlement figure is and work out the balance of the purchase with the owner. Once you’re happy with your checks, you taking a test drive with your own insurance and carried out a thorough inspection, you’d be ready to agree a price.

 

Tips On Buying A Used Car

It’s important to know the auto trader doesn’t offer payment or shipping services so beware of any emails claiming to offer them. Remember, if your sure of the legitimacy of any emails contact our customer security. The quickest way to pay and the easiest way to push for a discount is to buy with cash upfront. Taking out a loan upfront effectively makes you cash buy too. But the best practice come sale day to go to the bank with the seller, the seller should only be exchanging documents once the payment has been processed. If you pay using a credit card, you will have more protection under the Consumer Credit Act, if anything goes wrong. If choosing to buy from a dealer, you also have the option of obtaining finance through connecting credit or hire purchase. Again, if something goes wrong with the vehicle under the Sale of Goods Act, the finance company is jointly and severally liable with the retailer for any breach of contract. So if the retailer refuses to put it right, you can speak to the finance company direct.